Book Review: Between Two Shores By Jocelyn Green

Between Two Shores Cover

Blurb:

The daughter of a Mohawk mother and French father in 1759 Montreal, Catherine Duval would rather remain neutral in a world tearing itself apart. Content to trade with both the French and the British, Catherine is pulled into the Seven Years’ War against her wishes when her British ex-fiancé, Samuel Crane, is taken prisoner by her father. Samuel claims he has information that could help end the war, and he asks Catherine to help him escape.

Peace appeals to Catherine, even if helping the man who broke her heart does not. But New France is starving, and she and her loved ones may not survive another winter of conflict-induced famine. When the dangers of war arrive on her doorstep, Catherine and Samuel flee by river toward the epicenter of the battle between England and France. She and Samuel may impact history, but she fears the ultimate cost will be higher than she can bear.

General Thoughts:

This author is all about the details, and that’s a good thing. From the very first chapter, I was thrown into a vivid world in mid 18th century America. I could feel the tension a high turmoil environment brought for Catherine, her family, and Samuel.

Catherine, a French-Mohawk woman, was caught between her French side and Mohawk side of the family. With the death of her mother, she made the decision to go to her French father, leaving her siblings behind. This isolated Catherine for a while, especially as she struggled to gain acceptance from her father, who showed very little of it. But when Englishman Samuel came into the picture as her father’s servant, they forged a friendship, which later turned into love.

Eventually Samuel escaped with the promise of reuniting and marrying Catherine, but that never happened. However as war ravaged on, he returned as his father’s servant, which led to greater challenges for Catherine, such as learning to forgive him for his failed promise and helping him flee once again from her father to deliver information that could end the war, in the British’s favor.

I like how the author created complicated characters. They weren’t predictable, knowing everything and having everything under control. This led to many surprises, especially on Samuel’s end. Catherine was the most compelling character to me, because she had the hardest battle to overcome: accepting reality and learning to forgive. This led to some self-reflection on my part. I considered my own reality, realizing that no matter how brave, strong-willed, or determined one is, there are some things one can’t control or change, especially in regards to people. However, one can always overcome and grow.

I will say the ending was bittersweet to me. I believe things ended as best as they could, giving what was revealed about the characters and plot. However, there were some things I wished wouldn’t have happened between Catherine, her family, and Samuel, which if you read the story, you will understand what I’m referring to. But then again, the story depicted the reality of a war-torn, high conflict world, so to me, it’s representation was believable.

Recommendation:

I would recommend this story to readers who enjoy historical fiction, especially American history. The author definitely did her homework, not holding back on the reality of the time period (mid-1700s). I also think readers who are looking for realism, characters who don’t always get a happily ever after, but who still reach a light at the end of the tunnel will like this book as well.

Rating:

4 out of 5 stars. This was a well-written story. The author was vivid in her world building and character behaviors. As I read each page, I could easily visualize the scenes and feel the tension. As a story that includes war, it can be a little graphic so for readers who are sensitive to this, they should be aware. Nevertheless, reading the story is worthwhile as it delivers a strong message of acceptance and forgiveness.

***This book was given to me by Bethany House for an honest review.***

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3 thoughts on “Book Review: Between Two Shores By Jocelyn Green

  1. This book sounds so interesting because of the background! Good review, Crystal.

      1. You’re welcome! I’ll try to add some books on my list after I complete my TBR.

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